Core3 vs. TrinityCore – Which is better to work with?

KISS, that fun phrase every computer science teacher loves to share with his students, is the at the heart of this whole post; TrinityCore (a World of Warcraft server emulator) is a simple, straight forward C++/MySQL project, while Core3 (a Star Wars Galaxies server emulator) is about as “Mad Scientist” as one can get with programming. The difference is… well, it’s truly dumbfounding – so much so that I thought I would take some time to write about it.

If we go way back to my early 20s, I had a good laugh at my friend for playing Everquest, until he bought me a copy and it absorbed me into its oozing mass of unkempt humans and never ending flows of pretty text too. Man that game had a text message for everything!

You fart
You giggle
Kazantoopia runs away in disgust!
You take two steps
You take two more steps
You stop and look around

OK, maybe it wasn’t that bad, but it sure was game that had a funny way of drawing you into it and it basically made me give up single player games for more than a decade. Sure, I moved on from EQ to SWG and WoW (primarily), but I was always playing some kind of MMO. Of course, being a creative person who really wanted to be a part of the worlds I was visiting, I always wished that I could hop in there and make the tweaks and changes to the games that would make them perfect (for me!).

Luckily for me, after I had my fill of online interactions with an increasingly shitty community of people who play online games, I discovered that a bunch of folks far smarter than myself had built systems to emulate the servers of some of the MMOs I liked to play. I did play Star Wars Galaxies, on and off, until it shutdown in December of 2012, but after playing the Mist of Pandaria beta for World of Warcraft, I threw in my towel and walked away from WoW – Blizzard had simply taken a game that I liked and made it into a game that I no longer liked. Unfortunately, for the longest time I had a computer that wasn’t capable of running the 64Bit virtual machines used by these mysterious server emulators, so it took me until early 2014 to start puttering around with them. Since that time, I have learned way more about programming, GNU/Linux, client modding, and project management than I ever knew before and as a result, I have some worldly opinions about what is and isn’t fun work with.

I think the following summary really speaks for itself.

TrinityCore Requires:
– Windows or Linux
– A moden C++ compiler
– Some C++ standard libraries
– A MySQL database
– A text editor (or programming a IDE)

Core3 Requires:
– Linux 64Bit
– Specific versions of the gcc C++ compiler
– Some C++ standard libraries
– Knowledge of the included non-standard C++ libraries
– A whole other custom java program called Public Engine
– IDL compiler (automated C++ creator with its own syntax)
– Specific versions of Lua
– Specific versions of Java
– An understanding of custom C++ hooks for Lua that SWGEmu created
– A MySQL database
– An array of obfuscated Berkeley databases
– A text editor (or programming a IDE)
– A prayer that you don’t need to look something up, because the documentation usually doesn’t exist

I am by no means being harsh, nor am I being soft, that’s just the reality of the design philosophies of the two projects. As you can see from the requirements alone, TrinityCore is obviously easier to work with than Core3, but it gets better. Wait until you get a load of this!

Things that TrinityCore does/has that Core3 can’t do / doesn’t have:

– Excellent documentation.
– A massive list of commands built into the server’s command line.
– A help system that describes the function of all of those commands.
– The ability to use all those server commands on an admin account inside the game.
– Even more commands that can be used inside the game for damned near everything, from database lookups to moving characters from one account to another.
– A sensible relational database for all object and account data that can be manipulated with standardized tools.
– The ability to add new interactive content by simply adding new data to the database.
– C++ that’s “just plain old .cpp and .h files” lol…
– A preconfigured system designed to easily add custom C++ and database content.

And finally…

Things that really fucking suck about Core3 that aren’t an issue with TrinityCore:

– The documentation sucks. There’s not enough of it and what is there is disorganized and often out-dated.
– Client tools are required to look up some important information.
– Said client tools only work in Windows.
– The need to create/edit an arse load of Lua files to make even the most simple content.
– The lack of discipline and planning shown by the way previously completed content is frequently broken by new content and/or arbitrary changes to dependencies.
And my personal favourite:
– The development team has a history of being hostile in general, but their especially disinterested in discussing anything related to the creation of content beyond the scope of their desire to emulate SWG patch 14.1 (bugs and all…).

Now, I have nothing but respect for the good people who have spent thousands of hours building SWGEmu’s Core3 architecture and indeed, it’s better than anything I could put together on my own, but the plain truth of the matter is that in many ways, it’s really not fun to work with at all. When you add the convoluted nightmare of the client, modding SWGEmu quickly becomes a tedious quagmire of, well, stuff that feels more like boring work than fun hobby programming. On the hand, while I can’t say what it’s like to modify the WoW client, as I haven’t had the desire to do so, I can say that modifying the TrinityCore server is pretty much a dream come true.

I really enjoyed my time playing World of Warcraft during the Burning Crusade and Wrath of the Lich King. Now, thanks to TrinityCore, I have a fun little WotLK themed programming hobby, which I call “Solozeroth“, to play around with and learn from. And I must proclaim with utmost of joy and exuberance, puttering with TrinityCore is a genuinely fun way to practice and learn industry standard MySQL and C++!


PSA Soap Box Happy Hour:
Make sure you buy a copy of World of Warcraft or Star Wars Galaxies if you’re going to be working with either, eh. Having spent well over $1,000 on each over the years myself, funnelling my hard earned dollars into Blizzard and Sony Online Entertainment by purchasing game boxes, subscriptions, expansions, and services, I don’t feel bad at all for continuing to use my CD/DVDs of the games (especially given that it’s otherwise impossible to enjoy those versions of the games). Don’t be thieving arsehole, buy the games. đŸ™‚

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